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Monday, December 22, 2014

Disruptive Trends for the Enterprise IT Market in 2015

This is the season for predicting trends, and 451 Research recently shared their list of key issues that will dominate the IT industry over the coming year. The following are some of these trends.

There is an explosion of activity around software containerization, leading 451 analysts to anticipate disruption in IT departments during 2015, as they start to use Docker. Savvy vendors are already in sync with this phenomena.

While containerization technology has existed for years, in particular as a software component of Linux distributions, Docker is a more lightweight form that is widely viewed as a next-generation virtualization technology.

451 analysts believe Docker will be adopted by large enterprises to work alongside, as well as replace, traditional virtual machines (VMs) because of its management and efficiency advantages.

Docker has not yet achieved parity with traditional VMs in some critical areas, including orchestration and security, and a large number of vendors are rapidly preparing to address this space.

Moreover, many enterprise IT leaders are tempted by improved efficiencies from integrating software-defined compute, storage and networking, while vendors seek the potential to differentiate their offerings as the market moves towards bare-metal systems and open-source software.

In 2015, vendors will have to change their approach to product delivery and their partner ecosystems, and enterprise customers will have to adjust their operations to gain the benefits of cloud-based platform convergence.

Cloud computing security spending will rise. In 2015, new venture funding will continue at or near record levels. This is good news for the security vendor sector, but the underlying causes are troubling for the enterprise.

451 analysts believe that IT security is typically reactive -- tools emerge as new IT architectures evolve. The growth in IT applications and enterprise mobility means that security will evolve, but two years behind the need.

Meanwhile, demand for easy and pervasive access to corporate data grows. Part of the solution is the notion of a micro-modular data center -- what 451 analysts refer to as the next generation of computing server closet.

These small data centers bring IT capabilities nearer the point of use and are delivered as complete, self-contained systems. Micro-modular data centers include compute, storage and network connectivity -- coupled with the required supporting infrastructure.

"While these are some of the more interesting trends, we have identified many others that will impact the way many do business in 2015 and beyond," said Brett Azuma, senior vice president, 451 Research.