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Current TV for a Web Generation

Associated Press report -- Much of the talk around Al Gore's new Current TV network has been broadly philosophical, like the former vice president's statement that "we want to be the television home page for the Internet generation." With its debut, Current TV will be judged by the same mundane standards as other networks -- on whether its programming can hold a viewer's interest. Gore and his fellow investors envision Current as a sounding board for young people, a step beyond traditional notions of interactivity. They want viewers to contribute much of the network's content now that quality video equipment is widely available. Based on material previewed on its Web site, Current at first glance seems like a hipper, more irreverent version of traditional television newsmagazines. Most of its programming will be in "pods," roughly two to seven minutes long, covering topics like jobs, technology, spirituality and current events. An Internet-like on-screen progress bar will show the pod's length. Click to View Featured Clips Online

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