Skip to main content

Current Analysis: Texas Senate Bill 5 Opinion

The state of Texas has signed Senate Bill 5, the Telecommunications Reform Act, into law. The Act cites that "significant technology changes" have occurred since Texas passed its last Public Utilities Regulatory Act a decade ago. The overhaul goes into great detail governing regulations for broadband over power lines (BPL), should electric utilities choose to provide these services. Among other changes, the Act also clears the way to deregulate all incumbent local exchange carriers (ILECs), redefining them as "transitioning companies" that can qualify as non-dominant carriers in major markets that present at least token local competition. But most important, the Act aims to bypass the traditional local video franchise system, establishing a way for the RBOCs to receive statewide video franchises. Texas Governor Rick Perry signed the legislation into law on September 7, 2005, and the next day the Texas Cable & Telecommunications Association (TCTA) filed suit in federal co urt against the Act.

According to a Current Analysis assessment, "The Texas Telecommunications Reform Act could not have represented the interests of the RBOCs better if they had written it themselves. The actual punch in the legislation - deregulating ILECs and allowing them to bypass the local video franchise system by applying for statewide franchise licenses - is sugarcoated by a lengthy treatise on BPL. BPL is a still nascent service that's years away from becoming a mainstream market competitor, and that's assuming that energy providers go full-throttle with technology development and buildout. The legislation at key points so clearly benefits the RBOCs at the expense of cable providers that entire sections appear ripe to be torpedoed in the courts. The cable industry, in its federal suit, filed almost immediately after the legislation was signed into law in the federal U.S. District Court, Western District of Texas, Austin division, seeks to do just that."

Popular posts from this blog

Software-Defined Infrastructure: The Platform of Choice

As more organizations adapt to a hybrid working model for their distributed workforce, enterprise CIOs and CTOs are tasked with delivering new productivity-enabling applications, while also seeking ways to effectively reduce IT cost, complexity, and risk. Traditional IT hardware infrastructure is evolving to more software-based solutions. The worldwide software-defined infrastructure (SDI) combined software market reached $12.17 billion during 2020 -- that's an increase of 5 percent over 2019, according to the latest market study by International Data Corporation (IDC). The market grew faster than other core IT technologies. The three technology pillars within the SDI market are: software-defined compute (53 percent of market value), software-defined storage controller (36 percent), and software-defined networking (11 percent). "Software-defined infrastructure solutions have long been popular for companies looking to eliminate cost, complexity, and risk within their data cente

Digital Identity Verification Market to Reach $16.7B

As more enterprise organizations embrace the ongoing transition to digital business transformation, CIOs and CTOs are adopting new technologies that enable the secure identification of individuals within their key stakeholder communities. A "digital identity" is a unique representation of a person. It enables individuals to prove their physical identity during transactions. Moreover, a digital identity is a set of validated digital attributes and credentials for online interactions -- similar to a person's identity within the physical world. Individuals can use a 'digital ID' to be verified through an authorized digital channel. Usually issued or regulated by a national ID scheme, a digital identity serves to identify a unique person online or offline. Digital Identity Systems Market Development Complementary to more traditional forms of identification, digital identity verification systems can enhance the authenticity, security, confidentiality, and efficiency of

Global Pandemic Accelerates the Evolution of Transportation

Given the current trends across the globe, organizations that depend upon the continued growth of personal vehicle ownership will need to consider a plan-B scenario. While some companies will be able to adapt, others may find that their traditional business model has been totally disrupted. According to the latest worldwide market study by Juniper Research, Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) will displace over 2.2 billion private car journeys by 2025 -- that's rising from 471 million in 2021. Juniper believes that for MaaS to enjoy widespread adoption, subscription or on-the-go packages need to offer a strong combination of transport modes along with feasible infrastructure changes, high potential for data collection and low barriers to MaaS deployments. Mobility-as-a-Service Market Development The concept of MaaS involves the provision of multi-modal end-to-end travel services through a single platform by which users can determine the best route and price according to real-time traffic