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France Telecom Tests 100Mbps VDSL2

France Telecom claimed a world first, with the announcement that it had commenced laboratory testing of VDSL2 transmission systems with speeds of up to 100Mbit/s on standard copper lines. The technology, which is based on similar DMT modulation to ADSL and ADSL2+, uses an extended frequency band to 30MHz to achieve the required high transmission speeds.

Achieving these high speeds over existing copper plant is going to be critical for telcos as they start to deploy widescale video and triple play services. The move by the broadcast world towards high definition (after decades of delays) means that more bandwidth will be required for video services.

The First European Research and Innovation Exhibition held back in June in Paris provided France Telecom with the opportunity to demonstrate that high-definition television over copper was finally becoming a reality, thanks to networks with increased bandwidth capabilities and compression techniques. Today, the company is stepping up its efforts by testing VDSL2 transmission systems - which were finally approved by the ITU in May - in its R&D laboratories.

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