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Veoh Virtual Video Peercasting Network

Veoh Networks has released further details of what is claimed to be the first internet television peercasting network, now in beta testing, which could transform the online distribution of video material. The Veoh software, available to download in beta form for the PC or Mac, provides a virtual video network that is able to distribute full-screen, television quality video to a global audience of users with broadband internet connections. There will be no charge for publishing material, and no charge for downloading, although the ability to charge for video will be a �key feature� of the final release.

Veoh aims to develop a community of publishers and consumers, with content approved by editors. The system will have integration with RSS syndication and Google Video, enabling content providers to publish to multiple video systems.

A number of other initiatives are also aiming to use peer-to-peer approaches to video distribution. The BBC is about to enter a limited public trial of its interactive media player, using technology from Kontiki. A similar system will be used by UK satellite broadcaster BSkyB. A number of start-ups, such as Brightcove, are also planning to provide an internet video publishing platform.

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