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Demand Flat for In-Home Health Monitoring

The U.S.'s senior and baby boomer populations are not currently receptive to in-home health monitoring, according to a Parks Associates study, which reports that two-thirds from both populations see little to no value in these services.

Of the one-fifth who find the service valuable, 60 percent would still not spend extra money, either out-of-pocket or in higher healthcare premiums, for in-home health monitoring. Only 20 percent would accept a moderate increase in health insurance premiums, and another 16-20 percent would be willing to pay out-of-pocket for it.

According to Parks Associates, in-home health monitoring is a service that allows patients to use network-connected measurement devices, such as glucose meters, weight scales, and peak flow meters, to collect vital signs at home and send electronic data to clinicians for ongoing chronic condition monitoring.

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