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U.S. Broadband Policy: the Weakest Link

Randall Stross wrote a column entitled "Hey, Baby Bells: Information Still Wants to Be Free" for the New York Times that raises the same nagging questions about the state of broadband access progress within the United States.

"At the top of my wish list for next year's Consumer Electronics Show is this: the introduction of broadband service across the country that is as up to date as that 103-inch flat-screen monitor just introduced by Panasonic. The digital lifestyle I see portrayed so alluringly in ads is not possible when the Internet plumbing in our homes is as pitiful as it is. The broadband carriers that we have today provide service that attains negative perfection: low speeds at high prices."

"Slow broadband seems to be our cursed lot. Until we get an upgrade - or rather an upgrade to an upgrade - the only Americans who will enjoy truly fast and inexpensive service will be those who leave the country."

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