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Portable & Mobile Long Form Video Market

The market for long form mobile/portable video content (video content of greater than 30 minutes) is currently in an experimental phase, and will likely remain at this stage for at least two years, reports In-Stat. By 2008, however, the industry will begin to gain traction and demonstrate its long-term potential.

The greatest potential for this market rests with its ability to complement the existing video industry. For example, there will be over 50 million portable media players in use worldwide by 2008, says Michael Inouye, In-Stat analyst. The portable/mobile long form video market will not likely cannibalize sales from the DVD and other traditional markets, but rather, supplement top-line growth.

In-Stat's study found the following:

- It is not clear if users will prefer an all-purpose multimedia cellular phone or separate voice and multimedia devices.

- Mobile video subscribers stand to represent over 10 percent of US wireless subscribers by 2009.

- Roughly one out of eight respondents in an In-Stat survey of mobile users expressed interest in mobile video for the cellular market.

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