Skip to main content

Prediction that Spam Will Diminish E-Mail Use

According to a newly published IDC study, a resurgence of spam and the increased frequency of being replaced by text messaging and voice over IP (VoIP) calling, especially among younger consumers and workers, will make it more difficult for email to maintain its status as the leading mission-critical electronic communications method.

IDC predicts that nearly 97 billion emails, over 40 billion of which will be spam messages, will be sent daily worldwide in 2007. This is the first year that spam email volumes are expected to exceed person-to-person email volumes sent worldwide.

"Spam volumes are growing faster than expected due to the success of image-based spam in bypassing antispam filters and of email sender identity spoofing in getting higher response rates," said Mark Levitt, program vice president for IDC's Collaborative Computing and Enterprise Workplace research. "Instant messaging, joined by free and low-cost VoIP calling, will result in slower email growth, especially among teens and young adults."

I believe that the concept of spamming consumers is a byproduct of legacy mass-market advertiser thinking -- those schooled in broadcasting irrelevant messages to people, purely on the basis that they have the means to do so. That traditional model demonstrates a contempt for consumer's time and attention. It's grounded in the belief that there is no negative consequence to applying interruption-based marketing principles.

IDC estimates that the size of business email volumes sent annually worldwide in 2007 will approach 5 exabytes, nearly doubling the amount over the past two years (Note: 1 exabyte = 1 thousand petabytes = 1 million terabytes = 1 billion gigabytes). IDC believes that email solution providers and their customers need to respond to these continued threats to email by doing the following:

- Recognize that email will be only one of several core elements of the emerging unified communications vision that solution providers will offer customers.

- Deploy multiple layers of commercial antispam software, appliances, and services that are regularly updated to increase effectiveness over time.

- Provide equal access to email from desktop and wireless access devices with Ajax and push email.

Popular posts from this blog

The Cloud Imperative for Telecom Operators

The telecom sector is undertaking an update of its IT infrastructure. As demand for data continues to soar with the proliferation of 5G and new apps, network operators can't rely on their legacy hardware and network architectures. The process of "Cloudification" offers a path to reduce costs, improve efficiency and scalability, plus meet increasingly ambitious infrastructure sustainability goals. According to the latest market study by Juniper Research, cloudification spending by telecom operators will see tremendous growth in the coming years, rising from $26.6 billion in 2024 to $64.9 billion by 2028 -- that's a 144 percent increase in just four years. Telecom Cloud Apps Market Development "Telecom networks are becoming more complex; requiring increasingly automated network management systems. However, operators must insulate mission-critical traffic when reducing power, to guarantee quality of service for enterprises," said Alex Webb, research analyst at