Skip to main content

Web 2.0 Mash-ups and Over-the-Top Threats

The emergence of Web 2.0 technologies from the IT world is already having a significant impact on the way that telecom service providers are planning their next-generation service strategies, leading some telcos to rethink the role that IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) will play in next-generation service creation, according to the latest report from Light Reading.

"Content providers are emerging as a serious rival to network operators in the next-generation services arena, and they are working to develop competitive services using completely different approaches than those slowly making inroads in the telecom sector," says Caroline Chappell, research analyst with Light Reading's Services Software Insider and author of the report. "Increasingly, the Internet world is becoming a source of over-the-top digital content services using Web 2.0 technologies that have nothing to do with telco standards such as IMS and SIP."

If telcos resist incorporating Web 2.0 designs into their next-generation service creation factories, they risk being disintermediated in a fast-evolving digital services value chain, Chappell warns. "Their services may lose out to the rising tide of over-the-top digital content applications, and they may forfeit the potentially lucrative opportunity of becoming a service broker, aggregating and selling large numbers of Web 2.0 services."

I commend BT for conceptually embracing a more open business model with its Web21C concept, however, the partnership with Microsoft for the "Connected Services Sandbox" competition is puzzling to me -- partly because I've not previously considered their developer network as a source of Web 2.0 innovation.

The notion of enabling managed network mash-ups is appealing, and I understand the concerns about the inherently complex and expensive IMS platforms, but if I was looking for a source of creative service delivery platform (SDP) inspiration, I'd tap into the Linux community, not the Microsoft developer network.

Other key findings of the Light Reading study include:

- The operator portal model for revenue generation is under threat, and operators should investigate a Web 2.0 marketplace model to become service aggregators and brokers.

- BT expects its Web 2.0 strategy -- Web21C SDK -- to radically change its service creation environment and development culture, as a part of its transformation program.

- Open-source SIP servers are currently available from Ericsson and Sun, providing network operators with a complete open-source Web 2.0/Java EE/SIP service development environment.

Popular posts from this blog

Hybrid Work: How to Enhance Employee Productivity

When you hire qualified talent for a key role and trust them to perform, you'll likely achieve the best outcome. Skilled and experienced people will deliver results, regardless of the challenges. That's a key lesson learned from the pandemic experience as most knowledge workers were asked to work from their homes. However, some resist returning to an open-plan office. It's unacceptable. Meanwhile, forward-thinking leaders decided a "return to normal" is undesirable, and in hindsight, everyone should aspire to be more accomodating than before. Therefore, location flexibility is okay. Hybrid Workforce Market Development How will people adapt to these changes? They'll apply the modern IT tools at their disposal. They'll learn new skills and thrive. Nearly 80 percent of employees are now successfully using online collaboration tools for work in 2021 -- that's up from just over half of workers in 2019, according to the latest market study by Gartner. This g

Mobility-as-a-Service Creates Disruptive Travel Options

Building on significant advances in big data, analytics, and the Internet of Things (IoT), more innovative transit service offerings aim to increase public transport ridership and reduce emissions or congestion within metropolitan areas. By providing these services through smartphone apps, the transit services also significantly increase user convenience, providing information on different human mobility offerings -- including public transport, ridesharing, and autonomous vehicles. Mobility-as-a-Service Market Development According to the latest market study by Juniper Research, Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) subscribers will generate $53 billion in revenue for MaaS platform providers by 2027 -- that's rising from $5.3 billion in 2021. Let's start with a basic definition. MaaS is the provision of multi-modal end-to-end travel services through single platforms, by which users can determine an optimal route and price. The study identified a monthly subscription model as key to incr

Upside for New 5G Network Transport Infrastructure

The global mobile communication sector is in the midst of a significant network infrastructure upgrade to support the introduction of new high-bandwidth and low-latency broadband service offerings.  Telecom service provider data centers have an important role in fifth-generation (5G) network deployments. Providers undergoing their transition to Stand-Alone (SA) 5G must understand the technical demands of telco data centers and the key enablers of those offerings. According to the latest worldwide market study by ABI Research, the major prerequisites of 5G and the emerging transport solutions would help operators position themselves to successfully capitalize on the new revenue opportunities from delivering differentiated 5G connectivity services. 5G Transport Network Market Development "The rise of the telco data center has a high degree of confluence with the requirements of SA 5G architectures. SA 5G and its increasing reliance on telco data centers can be attributed to the incr