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Broadband Digital Home Network Evolution

By 2013, the average household will have 2.5 times as many digital media devices -- computing, gaming, stationary digital consumer electronics, portable and mobile wireless devices -- in use as compared with 2008, according to the latest market study by In-Stat.

Accompanying this adoption will be a rise in the number of these devices that are network-enabled, leveraging various wired mediums and wireless technologies, like coax, phone wiring, powerline, Ethernet, and Wi-Fi.

Networking over wiring that already exists in homes is becoming increasingly important. This is particularly the case among broadband service provider entertainment networks that connect set-top boxes together and to residential gateways.

"Over the next few years, service providers will drive the growth of in-home networks" says Joyce Putscher, In-Stat analyst.

Digital media entertainment networks tie set-top boxes together, enabling additional services, such as whole-home DVR. Providers will encourage more PC home networks by replacing modem-only households with residential gateways -- CPE devices that include additional features and access to new value-added services (VAS).

In-Stat's market study found the following:

- Two segregated home networks (HN) have been evolving -- a service provider-centric network, and a PC-centric network. Each is leveraging different business models and technologies.

- While consumers want to be able to move content and services between the two types of networks, both technical and business model barriers will continue to stand in their way.

- Average PC home network throughput will rise by more than 70 percent from 2008 to 2013.

- Nearly two thirds of consumer respondents from In-Stat's survey expressed an interest in watching Internet video on their TV.

- Thus far, most service provider deployments using MoCA and HomePNA have been in North America, in terms of volume.

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