Skip to main content

Mobile Internet Revenue Tops $100 Billion in 2010

Rising mobile phone penetration and the proliferation of mobile broadband continues to boost wireless service provider revenue. ABI Research estimates global wireless service revenue at more than $159 billion for 3Q 2010, of which data services account for nearly one third.

Mobile Internet revenue is estimated at about $100 billion for all of 2010 -- that's a 20 percent increase from the previous year and almost three times more than revenue earned five years ago.

"The rapid uptake of mobile broadband has increasingly revolutionized network operator strategies," says ABI research associate Fei Feng Seet.

Consumers are now spending more time on social networking, blogging and online gaming among other activities, and they need to stay connected everywhere.

This has contributed to the success of new brands such as Clearwire, Yota and UQ, and further pushed network operators around the world to build next-generation data networks rapidly, to gain market share.

Mobile network operators in many world regions have announced their interest in, or commitment to, deploying LTE 4G networks.

According to ABI practice director Neil Strother, "A handful of markets including Hong Kong, India, Canada, Austria, France and the UK are starting to face declines in voice usage. The resulting loss of revenue is compounded by a growing subscriber base that uses the Internet for social communication. New applications such as Skype video calling and Whatsapp messaging are expected to capture additional market share."

ABI Research expects the rising mobile data usage and revenue trend to continue through 2011, coupled with more focus on mobile applications -- or the apps, as they're more often described by those who use them on their smartphones.

Popular posts from this blog

The Subscription Economy Churn Challenge

The subscription business model has been one of the big success stories of the Internet era. From Netflix to Microsoft 365, more and more companies are moving towards recurring revenue streams by having customers pay for access rather than product ownership. The subscription economy cuts across many industries -- such as streaming services, software, media, consumer products, and even transportation with the rise of mobility-as-a-service. A new market study by Juniper Research highlights the central challenge facing subscription businesses -- reducing customer churn to build a loyal subscriber installed base. Subscription Model Market Development The Juniper market study provides an in-depth analysis of the subscription business model market landscape and associated customer retention strategies. A key finding is that impending government regulations will make it easier for customers to cancel subscriptions, likely leading to increased voluntary churn rates. The study report cites the